An Interview I Gave

Interview with Nana Darkoa Sekyiamah of African Women’s Development Fund ******* NS: How did your journey as a writer start? K.D.Y: I started scribbling on pieces of paper at around age 8 or 9 after my abuse. I think it was a way to deal with the chaos in my head and body. I continued with…

Scotch Bonnets Are Not for the Faint-Hearted (Spoonwiz)

Scotch Bonnets are some of the world’s hottest peppers. They rank anywhere from 100000-350000 on the Scoville Heat Unit (SHU) scale. This is a measure of how hot a chili pepper is (or for that matter, anything derived from a chili pepper). The scale is named after Wilbur Scoville who developed the test in 1912. Your…

5 WEEKS TO THE HOUR

It’s been 5 weeks to the hour Most Mondays I feel Lethargic all day Headaches and body aches I can’t explain I can’t sleep most Mondays Because I don’t want to Wake to that fateful call I don’t want to come collect your Limp body from the third hospital That did not have a bed…

INVISIBLE WIDOW

Today, I silently give thanks for having you in my life.

Today, I grieve you and quietly praise Yemaya for you being intimately mine for a time.

Today, I became the invisible widow.

Stranger

I put the key in the door. All these thoughts vanished as I quietly pushed open the door. She lay curled up on the 3-cushion, well-loved, black leather couch I had inherited from Craigslist. Her spindle-curled locs lay scattered around her head, slightly concealing her face and caressing her cheeks. Both arms were folded at the elbow in a prayer pose, supporting her sleeping head. I had only seen pictures and images from our Skype conversations. I wished she would stir so I could see her beautiful face. Two suitcases stood guard over her sleeping body. Despite all admonitions to pack light, here she was with luggage to last her for a couple months instead of the one-week trial we had agreed upon.

For My Siblings, In Solidarity (for the anniversary)

Where am I? I’m sure you are dying to know! For Christmas, I gave myself the gift of a second pilgrimage to Haiti, Ayiti, the beautiful land of beautiful people where the great economic divide is as visible as the night and day that marks the passing of time and where suffering, as widespread as it is, never keeps the people from smiling back when you make eye contact. I had to return to Ayiti. It had wrapped its arms around me in May 2002 when I made my first pilgrimage and it had refused to let go. So I honored it, and all who were in it, by returning.

Happy Boxing Day!

For months I have been kicking myself for going to Ghana in August instead. It would have been so much nicer at Christmas when everyone else was home as well, and definitely more enjoyable to go with Sheela. But I didn’t. I am here in the grey-slightly warming-up, sun-struggling-to-peek-through, Bay